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Friday, 2 September 2016

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Modern Snipers

Modern Snipers

The years since 9/11 have seen major changes in the way snipers are employed on the modern battlefield, alongside an incredibly rapid evolution in their weapons, equipment and training. This book covers the 14 years of near-constant warfare since the dawn of the 21st century, documenting where, when and how snipers have been deployed; their rifles, optics and their ancillary equipment such as laser range finders; their training and tactics and accounts of real-life operations involving sniper teams.

The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have reaffirmed the importance of snipers in both conventional and unconventional warfare, and this new study covers these developments in depth, as well as looking at the role of the sniper in police and counterterrorism environments.

Contents

Introduction to Sniping
Chapter 1 - Modern Sniper Training
Chapter 2 - Sniping in Afghanistan
Chapter 3 - Sniping in Iraq
Chapter 4 - Police and Counter Terrorism Sniping
Chapter 5 - Sniper Rifles
Chapter 6 - Optics, Range Fingers and Equipment
Bibliography
Index

British Battle Tanks

British Battle Tanks

When British soldiers charged across the Somme in September 1916 they were accompanied by a new, revolutionary weapon - the tank. After a stuttering start armoured behemoths such as the Mark IV, Mark V and Whippet Tank played a crucial role in bringing World War I to an end, but were then inexplicably rejected by their country of origin.

Marking the centenary of their battlefield debut this comprehensive volume traces the design and development of the famous British weapon system, from the initial concept of a steam powered tank during the Crimean War to the role the British military played in creating the infamous German Blitzkrieg tactic of World War II. Bolstered by historic photographs and stunning illustrations, author David Fletcher brings us the thrilling history behind British battle tanks.

The Samurai

The Samurai

The world of the samurai, the legendary elite warrior cult of old Japan, has for too long been associated solely with military history and has largely remained a mystery. In this exciting new book, Stephen Turnbull, the world's leading authority on the samurai, goes beyond the battlefield to paint a picture of the samurai as they really were. The world of the samurai warrior is revealed to be one of great richness, with familiar topics such as the cult of suicide, ritualised revenge and the lore of the samurai sword being seen in the context of an all-encompassing warrior culture that was expressed through art and poetry as much as through violence.

Sturmartillerie

Sturmartillerie

The Sturmartillerie was a key part of Germany's armoured arsenal throughout World War II. Its armoured assault guns were designed to support the artillery on the battlefield, largely using the purpose-built Sturmgesch├╝tz infantry support gun.

This new and exhaustive study details the development and operational history of this innovative force, as well as describing how its role and the tactics it employed changed from the glory years of Blitzkrieg through to the desperate defence of the last years of the war. It also describes the technical development and evolution of the vehicles employed, and includes combat action reports and excerpts from interviews with veterans.

The First Afghan War 1839-42

The First Afghan War 1839-42

In 1839 forces of the British East India Company crossed the Indus to invade Afghanistan on the pretext of reinstating a former king Shah Soojah to his rightful throne. The reality was that this was another step in Britain's Great Game - Afghanistan would create a buffer to any potential Russian expansion towards India. This history traces the initial, campaign which would see the British easily occupy Kabul and the rebellion that two years later would see the British army humbled. Forced to negotiate a surrender the British fled Kabul en masse in the harsh Afghan winter. Decimated by Afghan guerilla attacks and by the harsh cold and a lack of food and supplies just one European - Dr Brydon would make it to the safety of Jalalabad five days later. This book goes on to trace the retribution attack on Kabul the following year, which destroyed the symbolic Mogul Bazaar before rapidly withdrawing and leaving Afghanistan in peace for nearly a generation.

Contents

Introduction
Chronology
Opposing commanders
Opposing armies
Opposing plans
The campaign
Aftermath
The battlefield today
Further reading
Index

River Plate 1939

River Plate 1939

Days before the outbreak of World War II a handful of German commerce raiders put out to sea to prey on Allied merchantmen. Amongst them was the Panzerschiff ('armoured ship') Graf Spee, a formidable warship that boasted the firepower of a battleship but the size, speed and range of a cruiser. When World War II commenced, under the command of Captain Langsdorff the Graf Spee began a hunting spree across the South Atlantic and the Indian Ocean that eventual took her to the River Plate in search of her next victim - an Allied convoy. Instead she found three Royal Navy cruisers under the command of Commodore Harwood, eager to put an end to the 'pocket battleship' that had been terrorizing Allied merchant ships.

Featuring full colour artwork, archive photographs and meticulous research, this comprehensive volume explores the thrilling story behind the Battle of the River Plate, an engagement that unquestionably demonstrated the effectiveness of British seapower and diplomacy on an international stage.

Contents

Origins of the Campaign
Opposing Commanders
Opposing Fleets
Opposing Plans
Campaign
Battle
Action
Aftermath
Conclusion
Vessels today
Chronology
Bibliography

Apache Warrior vs U.S. Cavalryman

Apache Warrior vs U.S. Cavalryman

From the 1840s onward, United States military forces clashed with the Apache, a group of Native American peoples associated with the southwestern part of North America. US territorial expansion and conflict - first with Mexico and then during the Civil War - led to an escalation of hostilities that culminated in the defeat of the Apache leader Geronimo in 1886, although fighting continued into the 20th century. In this study the clashes at Cieneguilla (1854), First Adobe Walls (1864), and Cibecue Creek (1881) are assessed in detail.

Fully illustrated and featuring contemporary accounts and specially commissioned artwork, this history examines exactly how the Apache were able to pose such a grave threat to US forces and how their initial advantages were gradually negated by the cavalry. Examining the tactics, equipment and training available to each side over four decades of evolving conflict, this is an eye-opening combatant's eye view of one of history's most intriguing campaigns.

Contents

Introduction
The opposing sides
Combat 1
Combat 2
Combat 3
Analysis
Aftermath
Bibliography
Index

US Navy F-4 Phantom II Units of the Vietnam War 1964-68

US Navy F-4 Phantom II Units of the Vietnam War 1964-68

The F-4 Phantom II is perhaps the most famous post-war fighter. Primarily used as a land-based fighter-bomber and reconnaissance platform, its naval origins and the immense contribution made to the US war effort in Vietnam by its original carrier-based versions began its legend.

This title examines the unique aspects of the Phantom that made it so crucial to US Navy pilots during the Vietnam War - its massive engine power, long range, speed, the most powerful airborne search and fire-control radar installed in a fighter at the time, and of course its versatility as a ground attack and air-to-air platform. Packed with first hand accounts, unique profile artwork and rare photographs this is the history of one of the most important aircraft to be stationed on carriers off Southeast Asia during the war.

Contents

Chapter 1 Origins
Chapter 2 Early Days
Chapter 3 Bomber
Chapter 4 Hard Slog
Chapter 5 MiGs, Missiles and AAA
Appendices: US Navy F-4 wartime squadron deployments, dates and carriers in 1964-68, Losses listing, Plates Commentaries
Index

Fw 200 Condor Units of World War II

Fw 200 Condor Units of World War II

The Fw 200 Condor first made an appearance over Norway in April 1940, flying with the unit that eventually become synonymous with it - Kampfgeschwader 40. As the war in the west progressed, and German forces advanced, French airfields opened up, allowing the Condor to fly around the UK and out into the Atlantic, where it rapidly established itself as one of the key menaces to Allied shipping. Able to attack shipping directly, or able to guide U-Boats to their prey the Condor scored its first major success when it crippled the liner Empress of Great Britain.

But the tables were to turn on the 'Scourge of the Atlantic' as mechanical failures induced by their harsh operating environment and changes in Allied tactics began to take a toll. Vulnerable to aerial attack, the deployment of Allied carriers and their associated fighters combined with the introduction of more long range maritime patrol aircraft exposed the Condor's deficiencies. Packed with rare first-hand accounts, profile artwork and photographs, this is the history of one of the unsung types to take to the skies during World War 2.

Contents

1941 - Early Successes
1941 - Happy Times
1942-43 - Beginning of the End
1944-45 - Nowhere left to go
Appendices

The Barbary Pirates 15th–17th Centuries

The Barbary Pirates 15th–17th Centuries

For the best part of three centuries the 'corsairs' or pirates from the 'Barbary' coasts of North Africa dominated the Western and Central Mediterranean. They made forays far into the Atlantic, preying on the shipping and coastal settlements across Christian Europe, ranging from Greece to West Africa and the British Isles. In the absence of organized European navies they seldom faced serious opposition, and the scope of their raiding was remarkable. As well as piracy and slave-raiding they fought as privateers, sharing their spoils with the rulers of the port-cities that provided them with ships, men, and a ready market. This book examines their development and their style of fighting, chronicles their achievements and failures, and illustrates their appearance and that of their ships, explaining why they were so feared and effective.

Contents

Introduction
Chronology
Background - the Barbary states
Organization
Galleys
Appearance - arms and armour
Warfare and tactics
In action - period descriptions
Glossary and Bibliography
Plate commentaries

BT Fast Tank

BT Fast Tank

When the Red Army needed to mechanize its cavalry branch in the 1930s, the BT fast tank was its solution. Based on the American Christie high-speed tank, the Red Army began a program to adapt the design to its own needs. Early versions were mechanically unreliable and poorly armed but by the mid-1930s, the BT-5 emerged, armed with an excellent dual-purpose 45mm gun. It saw its combat debut in the Spanish Civil War in 1937 and was later used in the border battles with the Japanese Kwangtung Army in the late 1930s. The final production series, the BT-7, was the most refined version of the family.

One of the most common types in Red Army service in the first years of the Second World War, BT tanks saw extensive combat in Poland, Finland, and the opening phases of Operation Barbarossa in 1941 and latterly during the 1945 campaign against the Japanese in Manchuria - this is the story of their design and development history.

Contents

Introduction
Design and Development
Operational Use
Analysis and Conclusion
Bibliography
Index

The Composite Bow

The Composite Bow

An ancient design, emerging from Central Asia in the second millennium BC, the composite bow was adopted by a staggering variety of cultures, from nomadic tribal peoples such as the Huns, Turks and Mongols, to mighty empires such as the Romans, Byzantines, Persians, Arabs and Chinese. Offering high power and portability, the composite bow was an ideal cavalry weapon, though it was also used by infantry in open battle and as a siege weapon. In this important study, an expert on Eastern military technology tells the story of this extraordinary piece of military hardware; how it was made and how various cultures developed differing tactics for using it. He explains why the composite bow achieved such stunning successes and how it endured as a weapon of choice for thousands of years.

Contents

Introduction
Development
Use
Impact
Conclusion
Bibliography
Index
Early Iron Age Greek Warrior 1100-700 BC

Early Iron Age Greek Warrior 1100-700 BC

The period from 1200 BC onwards saw vast changes in every aspect of life on both the Greek mainland and islands as monarchies disappeared and were replaced by aristocratic rule and a new form of community developed: the city-state. Alongside these changes a new style of warfare developed which was to be the determining factor in land warfare in Greece until the defeat of the Greek city-state by the might of Macedonia at Chaeronea in 338 BC. This mode of warfare was based on a group of heavily armed infantrymen organized in a phalanx formation - the classic hoplite formation - and remained the system throughout the classical Greek period. This new title details this pivotal period that saw the transition from the Bronze Age warriors of Homer to the origins of the men who fought the Persian and Peloponnesian Wars.

Contents

Introduction Chronology Historical background Military organisation Weapons Chariotry Siege warfare Naval warfare The life of the warrior Warfare War campaigns museums and electronic resources Bibliography Glossary Index

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