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Tuesday, 18 June 2019

Project Update #7: 3D Printable Alien Tau-Style Scenery for Tabletop Wargames, Kickstarter from Wulfshéade Miniatures

Project Update #7: 3D Printable Alien Tau-Style Scenery for Tabletop Wargames, Kickstarter from Wulfshéade Miniatures

A series of STL files of buildings and structures for tabletop wargames.

First Stretch Goal Reached!

Today we hit the $2000 Stretch Goal, so this adds these components to the set:

Energy Fence

Energy Fence

Sensor Array

Sensor Array

Detail Structures

Detail Structures

Cargo Container and Crate

Cargo Container and Crate

Kickstarter
Wulfshéade Miniatures

Project Update #10: Infernal Chaos Dwarfs & Hobgoblins Miniatures, Kickstarter from Dancing Yak Miniatures

Project Update #10: Infernal Chaos Dwarfs & Hobgoblins Miniatures, Kickstarter from Dancing Yak Miniatures

Hobgoblins and evil dwarf miniatures in 10mm and 28mm scales.

Free model to backers

Free model to backers

Were pleased to announce we will be giving this model as a kickstarter exclusive for free to all backers in 10 or 28mm depending on scale ordered at no extra cost. (actual physical item must be bought not just $1 support pledges) Fundings at 82% and have five days left. we thank everyone for the support .Video of hobgoblin snap fit heads should be up tonight or tomorrow. 

Kickstarter
Dancing Yak Miniatures

12mm Bantam Blitz Buggy from Butlers Printed Models

One Bantam Blitz Buggy. Available in 6mm (1/285), 12mm (1/144), 15mm (1/100), 20mm (1/76) and 28mm (1/56).

The forerunner to the Willys jeep, most of those produced were sent via lend-lease to the UK and Russia

By now the war was under way in Europe, so the Army's need was urgent and demanding: Bids were to be received by July 22, a span of just eleven days. Manufacturers were given 49 days to submit their first prototype and 75 days for completion of 70 test vehicles. The Army's Ordnance Technical Committee specifications were equally stringent: the vehicle would be four-wheel drive, have a crew of three on a wheelbase of no more than 75 in, later upped to 80 in, and track no more than 47 in, feature a fold-down windshield, carry a 660 lb payload, and be powered by an engine capable of 85 lb⋅ft (115 N⋅m) of torque. The most daunting demand, however, was an empty weight of no more than 1,300 lb.

Initially, only American Bantam and Willys-Overland entered the competition. Ford joined later. Although Willys was the low bidder, Willys was penalized for requesting more time, and Bantam received the contract, as the only company committing to deliver a pilot model in 49 days and production examples in 75. Bantam's chief engineer, Harold Crist, who had previously worked on the first Duesenberg, and been an engineer at Stutz Motor Company of Indianapolis for 18 years, drafted freelance Detroit designer Karl Probst to collaborate. Probst turned down Bantam initially, but agreed to an Army request and began work on 17 July 1940.

Probst laid out full design drawings for the Bantam prototype, known as the Bantam Reconnaissance Car, or BRC, in just two days, and worked up a cost estimate the next day. Bantam's bid was submitted, complete with blueprints, on 22 July. To save time, the vehicle was put together using commercial off-the-shelf components as much as possible. Bantam adapted body stampings from its car line: the hood, cowl, dash and curvy front fenders – and the engine was a 112 cu in (1.8 l) Continental four-cylinder engine making 45 horsepower and 86 lb⋅ft of torque. Custom four-wheel drive train components were provided by Spicer.

Using off-the-shelf automotive parts where possible had partly enabled drawing up the blueprints quickly. By working backwards, Probst and Bantam's draftsmen converted what Crist and a few others had put together into drawings. The hand-built prototype was then completed in Butler, Pennsylvania, and driven to the Army vehicle test center at Camp Holabird, Maryland. It was delivered on 23 September 1940. The vehicle met all the Army's criteria except engine torque. The Bantam pilot (later also dubbed the "Blitz Buggy" or "Old Number One") presented Army officials with the first of what eventually evolved into the World War II U.S. military jeep.

Bantam Blitz Buggy

Bantam Blitz Buggy picture 1

Bantam Blitz Buggy picture 2

Bantam Blitz Buggy picture 3

Bantam Blitz Buggy picture 4

Bantam Blitz Buggy picture 5

Pictures shown are for 15mm models

All models supplied unpainted, unbased and without crew (figures)

3D printed to order

Butlers Printed Models

Monday, 17 June 2019

Project Update #6: 3D Printable Alien Tau-Style Scenery for Tabletop Wargames, Kickstarter from Wulfshéade Miniatures

Project Update #6: 3D Printable Alien Tau-Style Scenery for Tabletop Wargames, Kickstarter from Wulfshéade Miniatures

A series of STL files of buildings and structures for tabletop wargames.

New Structures added for a $2200 Stretch Goal

Here's a new, and much larger, structure that is now part of a $2200 Stretch Goal.

It can be used for a "generic" building, civilian or military. The top platform is also removable and you can use the landing platform in it's place.

The bunker underneath also has a removable top so you can place troops inside.

Tower with troop platform

Tower with troop platform

Tower with landing platform

Tower with landing platform

The second structure is still in-progress, but will also be part of this Stretch Goal. It can be used as an objective marker or scientific structure.

WIP Structure

WIP Structure

Kickstarter
Wulfshéade Miniatures

Project Update #5: 3D Printable Alien Tau-Style Scenery for Tabletop Wargames, Kickstarter from Wulfshéade Miniatures

Project Update #5: 3D Printable Alien Tau-Style Scenery for Tabletop Wargames, Kickstarter from Wulfshéade Miniatures

A series of STL files of buildings and structures for tabletop wargames.

Addition to the Landing Pad

A few backers expressed concern about the center of gravity on the landing pad, when a model is placed on it.

The center of gravity is well towards the side of the model with the tower, so it shouldn't be a problem.

But, if you want I made an additional component that you can use as a brace. You can use one in the center, one on each side or even three if you want.

Landing Pad Brace

Landing Pad Brace

Kickstarter
Wulfshéade Miniatures

12mm Merkava MBT from Butlers Printed Models

One Israeli Merkava MBT. Available in 6mm (1/285), 12mm (1/144), 15mm (1/100), 20mm (1/76) and 28mm (1/56).

The Merkava is a main battle tank used by the Israel Defense Forces. The tank began development in 1970, and entered official service in 1979. Four main variants of the tank have been deployed. It was first used extensively in the 1982 Lebanon War. The name "Merkava" was derived from the IDF's initial development program name.

Choose from:

Mk 1
Mk 2   - Additional turret armour and a number of small changes to the turret and hull
Mk 3   - Similar hull to Mk 2 but with a new turret

Merkava MBT

Merkava MBT 1

Merkava MBT 2

Merkava MBT 3

Merkava MBT 4

Merkava MBT 5

Merkava MBT 6

Merkava MBT 7

Pictures shown are for 15mm models

All models supplied unpainted, unbased and without crew (figures)

3D printed to order

Butlers Printed Models

Sunday, 16 June 2019

Project Update #4: 3D Printable Alien Tau-Style Scenery for Tabletop Wargames, Kickstarter from Wulfshéade Miniatures

Project Update #4: 3D Printable Alien Tau-Style Scenery for Tabletop Wargames, Kickstarter from Wulfshéade Miniatures

A series of STL files of buildings and structures for tabletop wargames.

Any structures you'd like to see made?

I'm looking for more ideas for stretch goals to add to the Kickstarter.

I'm already working on two structures, but is there anything I haven't made yet you'd like to see in this Kickstarter that I could add?

Let me know what you think.

Kickstarter
Wulfshéade Miniatures