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Saturday, 19 August 2017

New York State in the Revolutionary War

New York State in the Revolutionary War

While the Revolutionary War is often remembered by the battles fought in and around burgeoning population centers between American and British regular armies, the fight for the young nation was contested just as fiercely in the sparsely settled backcountry forests and valleys of the American countryside. The Mohawk Valley in central New York is one such example.

In 1777, the Mohawk Valley set the stage for not only a civil war between Loyalist and Patriot militias, but also a multi-national war between the Indian nations, whose military support was desired by both the British and the Americans. Central New York was the homeland of the Six Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy, whose members fought for the British and the Americans alike.

At the Battle of Oriskany on August 6, 1777, the Tryon County militia led by General Nicholas Herkimer and Oneida warriors marched northwest to resist the British siege of Fort Stanwix. Within a few miles of the fort, a British force comprised of primarily Native American warriors from the Senecas and Mohawks who, like the Oneidas, were members of the Iroquois Confederacy ambushed the Tryon County militia. After a torrential thunderstorm, Herkimer was forced to withdraw, having suffered more than 500 casualties. Many prominent chiefs and warriors fighting for the Loyalists, however, also fell that fateful day. As a result, the Iroquois reexamined their role in the siege. Known as “a place of great sadness,” the Oriskany Battlefield is today recognized by the Iroquois as a place of remembrance, and of reflection.

A plaque at Oriskany Battlefield State Park reads: “In the Valley homes, [there] was great mourning. For such a small population, the losses were almost overwhelming. In some families, the male members were wiped out. It was many a long, weary year before the sorrow and suffering caused by the sacrifices at Oriskany had been forgotten in the Valley of the Mohawk.”

The resulting conflict is one of the few battles of the American Revolution in which only North Americans participated. Its lasting ramifications echo in the Valley to this day. Thank you for your continued commitment to protecting the hallowed grounds where these brave and resilient soldiers fought.

Historical Map of Oriskany, New York

Fought on August 6, 1777, the Battle of Oriskany in central New York displayed a truly multi-nation conflict between nations of the Iroquois Confederacy and Loyalist and Patriot militias.

First Preservation Victories in New York

We recently announced our inaugural New York preservation effort. Thank you to those who helped save 160 acres at the Revolutionary War battlefield of Fort Ann and the 24-acre Horse Island which witnessed the War of 1812 Battle of Sackets Harbor.

Declaration of Independence In4

The Declaration of Independence is a seminal document, not only in American history, but world history as well. Despite its importance, it is still shrouded in myth. In our new In4 video, our teacher-in-residence Jim Percoco separates fact from fiction in less than 4 minutes!

Battle of Camden, South Carolina

The August 16, 1780 Battle of Camden was one of several devastating defeats suffered by the Americans in the early stages of the British military offensive in the South.

Save the Southern Campaign

Although largely forgotten today, many historians believe the Revolution was won at places like Kettle Creek, Hanging Rock, and Eutaw Springs. You can help protect 209 acres of battlefield land from this overlooked but crucial period in American history.

Save the Date! Brandywine Battlefield Preservation Ceremony

Mark your calendars for September 15 to attend a special ceremony celebrating the recent preservation successes at the Brandywine Battlefield. More details coming soon!

Campaign 1776
The Civil War Trust

Friday, 18 August 2017

Panzerkrieg: Volume 1 by Jason Mark

Panzerkrieg: Volume 1 by Jason Mark

Pre-Publication Offer for our forthcoming title, Panzerkrieg: Volume 1.

In this first volume of a series dedicated to studying German armoured operations at Stalingrad, the combat histories of Panzer-Abteilungen 103, 129 and 160 are examined in detail. A large number of incredible photos have been assembled, around 100 from the Bundesarchiv-Bildarchiv, the remaining 460 from veterans, private collectors and the author’s own archive, the overwhelming majority having never been published before. But don’t think this is “just” a photo volume; the operations of each battalion are covered in detailed narratives accompanied by maps, aerial photos, tables and of course hundreds of stunning images. This is by far our biggest book to date.

• Large 280m x 216mm format;
• 568 pages on high-quality gloss paper;
• 559 photos;
• 50 maps;
• 12 aerial photos;
• 3 appendices with daily panzer strengths of each battalion.
For more information about the book, follow this link:
Be sure to check out the samples – click on the link above and look for the 6 links. Here are a few teasers.

Leaping Horseman Books

Wednesday, 16 August 2017

Wargames, Soldiers & Strategy, 92, Oct-Nov 2017

Wargames, Soldiers & Strategy, 92, Oct-Nov 2017

Wargames, Soldiers and Strategy issue 92 with By land and sea - Britain in the Napoleonic Wars.

Special Feature: By land and sea - Britain in the Napoleonic Wars

Eoghan Kelly, 'The British army of the Napoleonic Wars - The worst-treated of men'.
Adrian McWalter, 'The birth of combined operations - Aboukir Bay, 1801'.
Mark Backhouse, 'An unusual Mediterranean mini campaign - Capture Capri! 1808'.
Adrian McWalter, 'A British disaster in Holland - Walcheren, 1809'.
Guy Bowers, 'Collecting a British Napoleonic army - For king and country'.
Ruben Torregrosa, 'Ruben's first Napoleonic vignette - Hats off to the British'.

Features

Ian Beal, 'The Battle of Homildon Hill 1402 - Medieval border wars'.
James Morris, 'The Roman struggle with guerrilla warfare in Spain - The Battle of Tribola'.
Mark Backhouse, 'Part II of the Sharp Practice mini campaign - Tigers in the valley'.
Joseph A. McCullough, 'A "Warriors of Athena" campaign - The witch of Mount Gramos'.
Michael Leck, 'Skirmish warfare after the Battle of Sekigahara - Rise of the Tokugawa Shogunate'.
Stephen Tunmore, 'Modelling the retreat from Moscow, Part II - Snow scenery'.
Mark Backhouse, 'Building a 17th century Portsmouth in 2mm - Small can be beautiful too!'.

Departments

Miniature reviews
Richard Clarke, 'Up Front - Don't keep it stupidly simple'.
Henry Hyde, 'Tabletop tactics - Beware of the underdogs'.
Steve Beckett, 'The Irregular - Bolt comic action!'.
Patrick Grinsell, 'A fourth edition for the popular WW2 rules - Let's play Flames of War'.
Rossco Watkins and David Davies, 'Game reviews - Mad Dogs with Guns, Dracula's America: Shadows of the West, General D'Armee and Sword Masters: A supplement for Open Combat'.
Book reviews

Wargames, Soldiers & Strategy

Walk in the footsteps of Gettysburg's Heroes

Walk in the footsteps of Gettysburg's Heroes

July 1, 1863. Confederate soldiers move toward Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Soldiers in blue stand like iron to slow the Southern advance. A local citizen named John Burns joins the fight to protect his town. Confederate General Robert E. Lee arrives on the scene in time to witness his victorious men advancing beyond a formidable ridge where Lee would soon make his headquarters. These are but a few of the stories of the Battle of Gettysburg, which is but one of thousands of Civil War engagements. And many Americans know little about it. Their children know even less.

We are trying to address the dearth of knowledge regarding our own history and you can help, one kid at a time! Instill a lifelong passion for history by bringing your son, daughter, niece, nephew, neighbor or friend to Gettysburg as we walk in the footsteps of thousands of Civil War soldiers at our fifteenth Generations event on September 2nd from 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Register today to reserve your spot.

Choose your side, get in line and march in the footsteps of your ancestors on the very ground where countless, dramatic events transpired. Most kids will get to don the uniforms of their choice as we learn about America and Americans. After we learn how to march in line, we will put our new skills to the test and try to outflank the enemy. The fighting, photos and fascinating evolution of the Gettysburg Battlefield comes to life. We’ll conclude with a special visit to Lee’s Headquarters, preserved and restored by Civil War Trust members.

If you can’t make it, share the event with a friend. Together, we can share the remarkable story of our nation's history with the next generation.

This Generations event is FREE for kids ages 7 to 17, but space is limited. Register today and join us at Gettysburg on September 2nd !

Video: Generations Program

Gettysburg Animated Map

Video: Gettysburg In4

The Civil War Trust

Monday, 14 August 2017

Upperville Battlefield: Save Goose Creek Bridge

For many, the name Gettysburg conjures up images of the Civil War's greatest battle — a titanic contest in which long lines of infantry marched over farm fields, across roads, and up hills that have since taken on legendary status. What many forget, however, is that the long road to Gettysburg began in the rolling pastures of Virginia, in a series of cavalry battles and skirmishes at places like Brandy Station, Aldie, Middleburg, and Upperville. On these battlefields, Union horsemen showed unusual pluck and at last proved themselves equal to their Confederate counterparts.  Over the years, the Civil War Trust has saved more than 3,560 acres of hallowed ground at these early Gettysburg Campaign battlefields. We now have the chance to add to that number.  As his army marched toward Pennsylvania, Confederate General Robert E. Lee hoped General Jeb Stuart's cavalry would conceal his movements from the prying eyes of Union scouts. Yankee cavalry desperately needed to pierce Stuart's screen to discover Lee's whereabouts and, if possible, divine his intentions. On June 21, 1863, Union General David McM. Gregg took a stab at two of Stuart's Confederate brigades along the banks of Goose Creek, near Upperville, Virginia.  At first, Stuart's men were successful, making a determined stand near an old stone bridge over Goose Creek. Gregg, however, called for support and was soon reinforced by Colonel Strong Vincent's infantry brigade — which, just two weeks later, would earn fame on Little Round Top. Gregg's troopers and a portion of Vincent's men stormed the bridge, keeping the Rebels' attention, while more of Vincent's men forded the creek — and captured an artillery piece while setting the remainder of the Rebels to flight. The Yankees, however, were no closer to discovering Lee's intentions or the movement toward Gettysburg.  You and I now have the chance to acquire 19.8 acres at the heart of the Upperville battlefield, including the stone bridge over Goose Creek. We will create a newly publicly-accessible park at Upperville, building on the success that created a park at the Middleburg battlefield in 2012. With your help — and that of our wonderful partners at the Fauquier and Loudoun Garden Club, the Virginia Department of Transportation, and NOVA Parks — we have the unique chance to protect a key part of a small, but important struggle of the momentous Gettysburg campaign.  Help us save Upperville and create a park!

For many, the name Gettysburg conjures up images of the Civil War's greatest battle a titanic contest in which long lines of infantry marched over farm fields, across roads, and up hills that have since taken on legendary status. What many forget, however, is that the long road to Gettysburg began in the rolling pastures of Virginia, in a series of cavalry battles and skirmishes at places like Brandy Station, Aldie, Middleburg, and Upperville. On these battlefields, Union horsemen showed unusual pluck and at last proved themselves equal to their Confederate counterparts.

Over the years, the Civil War Trust has saved more than 3,560 acres of hallowed ground at these early Gettysburg Campaign battlefields. We now have the chance to add to that number.

As his army marched toward Pennsylvania, Confederate General Robert E. Lee hoped General Jeb Stuart's cavalry would conceal his movements from the prying eyes of Union scouts. Yankee cavalry desperately needed to pierce Stuart's screen to discover Lee's whereabouts and, if possible, divine his intentions. On June 21, 1863, Union General David McM. Gregg took a stab at two of Stuart's Confederate brigades along the banks of Goose Creek, near Upperville, Virginia.

At first, Stuart's men were successful, making a determined stand near an old stone bridge over Goose Creek. Gregg, however, called for support and was soon reinforced by Colonel Strong Vincent's infantry brigade which, just two weeks later, would earn fame on Little Round Top. Gregg's troopers and a portion of Vincent's men stormed the bridge, keeping the Rebels' attention, while more of Vincent's men forded the creek and captured an artillery piece while setting the remainder of the Rebels to flight. The Yankees, however, were no closer to discovering Lee's intentions or the movement toward Gettysburg.

You and I now have the chance to acquire 19.8 acres at the heart of the Upperville battlefield, including the stone bridge over Goose Creek. We will create a newly publicly-accessible park at Upperville, building on the success that created a park at the Middleburg battlefield in 2012. With your help and that of our wonderful partners at the Fauquier and Loudoun Garden Club, the Virginia Department of Transportation, and NOVA Parks we have the unique chance to protect a key part of a small, but important struggle of the momentous Gettysburg campaign.

Help us save Upperville and create a park!

The Civil War Trust

Sunday, 13 August 2017

August 2017 New Releases by Panzer Depot

New Release from Panzer Depot in August.

Sdkfz 250/10

Sdkfz 250/10

Sdkfz 253

Sdkfz 253

10TP

10TP

Little Willie

Little Willie

Churchill A22D

Churchill A22D

Namer APC

Namer APC

AEC MKIII

AEC MKIII

Panzer Depot

Saturday, 12 August 2017

Save Goose Creek Bridge battlefield at Upperville

Save Goose Creek Bridge battlefield at Upperville

For many, the name Gettysburg conjures up images of the Civil War's greatest battle a titanic contest in which long lines of infantry marched over farm fields, across roads, and up hills that have since taken on legendary status. What many forget, however, is that the long road to Gettysburg began in the rolling pastures of Virginia, in a series of cavalry battles and skirmishes at places like Brandy Station, Aldie, Middleburg, and Upperville. On these battlefields, Union horsemen showed unusual pluck and at last proved themselves equal to their Confederate counterparts.

Over the years, the Civil War Trust has saved more than 3,560 acres of hallowed ground at these early Gettysburg Campaign battlefields. We now have the chance to add to that number.

As his army marched toward Pennsylvania, Confederate General Robert E. Lee hoped General Jeb Stuart's cavalry would conceal his movements from the prying eyes of Union scouts. Yankee cavalry desperately needed to pierce Stuart's screen to discover Lee's whereabouts and, if possible, divine his intentions. On June 21, 1863, Union General David McM. Gregg took a stab at two of Stuart's Confederate brigades along the banks of Goose Creek, near Upperville, Virginia.

At first, Stuart's men were successful, making a determined stand near an old stone bridge over Goose Creek. Gregg, however, called for support and was soon reinforced by Colonel Strong Vincent's infantry brigade which, just two weeks later, would earn fame on Little Round Top. Gregg's troopers and a portion of Vincent's men stormed the bridge, keeping the Rebels' attention, while more of Vincent's men forded the creek and captured an artillery piece while setting the remainder of the Rebels to flight. The Yankees, however, were no closer to discovering Lee's intentions or the movement toward Gettysburg.

You and I now have the chance to acquire 19.8 acres at the heart of the Upperville battlefield, including the stone bridge over Goose Creek. We will create a newly publicly-accessible park at Upperville, building on the success that created a park at the Middleburg battlefield in 2012. With your help and that of our wonderful partners at the Fauquier and Loudoun Garden Club, the Virginia Department of Transportation, and NOVA Parks we have the unique chance to protect a key part of a small, but important struggle of the momentous Gettysburg campaign.

Help us save Upperville and create a park!

The Civil War Trust