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Monday, 14 August 2017

Upperville Battlefield: Save Goose Creek Bridge

For many, the name Gettysburg conjures up images of the Civil War's greatest battle — a titanic contest in which long lines of infantry marched over farm fields, across roads, and up hills that have since taken on legendary status. What many forget, however, is that the long road to Gettysburg began in the rolling pastures of Virginia, in a series of cavalry battles and skirmishes at places like Brandy Station, Aldie, Middleburg, and Upperville. On these battlefields, Union horsemen showed unusual pluck and at last proved themselves equal to their Confederate counterparts.  Over the years, the Civil War Trust has saved more than 3,560 acres of hallowed ground at these early Gettysburg Campaign battlefields. We now have the chance to add to that number.  As his army marched toward Pennsylvania, Confederate General Robert E. Lee hoped General Jeb Stuart's cavalry would conceal his movements from the prying eyes of Union scouts. Yankee cavalry desperately needed to pierce Stuart's screen to discover Lee's whereabouts and, if possible, divine his intentions. On June 21, 1863, Union General David McM. Gregg took a stab at two of Stuart's Confederate brigades along the banks of Goose Creek, near Upperville, Virginia.  At first, Stuart's men were successful, making a determined stand near an old stone bridge over Goose Creek. Gregg, however, called for support and was soon reinforced by Colonel Strong Vincent's infantry brigade — which, just two weeks later, would earn fame on Little Round Top. Gregg's troopers and a portion of Vincent's men stormed the bridge, keeping the Rebels' attention, while more of Vincent's men forded the creek — and captured an artillery piece while setting the remainder of the Rebels to flight. The Yankees, however, were no closer to discovering Lee's intentions or the movement toward Gettysburg.  You and I now have the chance to acquire 19.8 acres at the heart of the Upperville battlefield, including the stone bridge over Goose Creek. We will create a newly publicly-accessible park at Upperville, building on the success that created a park at the Middleburg battlefield in 2012. With your help — and that of our wonderful partners at the Fauquier and Loudoun Garden Club, the Virginia Department of Transportation, and NOVA Parks — we have the unique chance to protect a key part of a small, but important struggle of the momentous Gettysburg campaign.  Help us save Upperville and create a park!

For many, the name Gettysburg conjures up images of the Civil War's greatest battle a titanic contest in which long lines of infantry marched over farm fields, across roads, and up hills that have since taken on legendary status. What many forget, however, is that the long road to Gettysburg began in the rolling pastures of Virginia, in a series of cavalry battles and skirmishes at places like Brandy Station, Aldie, Middleburg, and Upperville. On these battlefields, Union horsemen showed unusual pluck and at last proved themselves equal to their Confederate counterparts.

Over the years, the Civil War Trust has saved more than 3,560 acres of hallowed ground at these early Gettysburg Campaign battlefields. We now have the chance to add to that number.

As his army marched toward Pennsylvania, Confederate General Robert E. Lee hoped General Jeb Stuart's cavalry would conceal his movements from the prying eyes of Union scouts. Yankee cavalry desperately needed to pierce Stuart's screen to discover Lee's whereabouts and, if possible, divine his intentions. On June 21, 1863, Union General David McM. Gregg took a stab at two of Stuart's Confederate brigades along the banks of Goose Creek, near Upperville, Virginia.

At first, Stuart's men were successful, making a determined stand near an old stone bridge over Goose Creek. Gregg, however, called for support and was soon reinforced by Colonel Strong Vincent's infantry brigade which, just two weeks later, would earn fame on Little Round Top. Gregg's troopers and a portion of Vincent's men stormed the bridge, keeping the Rebels' attention, while more of Vincent's men forded the creek and captured an artillery piece while setting the remainder of the Rebels to flight. The Yankees, however, were no closer to discovering Lee's intentions or the movement toward Gettysburg.

You and I now have the chance to acquire 19.8 acres at the heart of the Upperville battlefield, including the stone bridge over Goose Creek. We will create a newly publicly-accessible park at Upperville, building on the success that created a park at the Middleburg battlefield in 2012. With your help and that of our wonderful partners at the Fauquier and Loudoun Garden Club, the Virginia Department of Transportation, and NOVA Parks we have the unique chance to protect a key part of a small, but important struggle of the momentous Gettysburg campaign.

Help us save Upperville and create a park!

The Civil War Trust

Sunday, 13 August 2017

August 2017 New Releases by Panzer Depot

New Release from Panzer Depot in August.

Sdkfz 250/10

Sdkfz 250/10

Sdkfz 253

Sdkfz 253

10TP

10TP

Little Willie

Little Willie

Churchill A22D

Churchill A22D

Namer APC

Namer APC

AEC MKIII

AEC MKIII

Panzer Depot

Saturday, 12 August 2017

Save Goose Creek Bridge battlefield at Upperville

Save Goose Creek Bridge battlefield at Upperville

For many, the name Gettysburg conjures up images of the Civil War's greatest battle a titanic contest in which long lines of infantry marched over farm fields, across roads, and up hills that have since taken on legendary status. What many forget, however, is that the long road to Gettysburg began in the rolling pastures of Virginia, in a series of cavalry battles and skirmishes at places like Brandy Station, Aldie, Middleburg, and Upperville. On these battlefields, Union horsemen showed unusual pluck and at last proved themselves equal to their Confederate counterparts.

Over the years, the Civil War Trust has saved more than 3,560 acres of hallowed ground at these early Gettysburg Campaign battlefields. We now have the chance to add to that number.

As his army marched toward Pennsylvania, Confederate General Robert E. Lee hoped General Jeb Stuart's cavalry would conceal his movements from the prying eyes of Union scouts. Yankee cavalry desperately needed to pierce Stuart's screen to discover Lee's whereabouts and, if possible, divine his intentions. On June 21, 1863, Union General David McM. Gregg took a stab at two of Stuart's Confederate brigades along the banks of Goose Creek, near Upperville, Virginia.

At first, Stuart's men were successful, making a determined stand near an old stone bridge over Goose Creek. Gregg, however, called for support and was soon reinforced by Colonel Strong Vincent's infantry brigade which, just two weeks later, would earn fame on Little Round Top. Gregg's troopers and a portion of Vincent's men stormed the bridge, keeping the Rebels' attention, while more of Vincent's men forded the creek and captured an artillery piece while setting the remainder of the Rebels to flight. The Yankees, however, were no closer to discovering Lee's intentions or the movement toward Gettysburg.

You and I now have the chance to acquire 19.8 acres at the heart of the Upperville battlefield, including the stone bridge over Goose Creek. We will create a newly publicly-accessible park at Upperville, building on the success that created a park at the Middleburg battlefield in 2012. With your help and that of our wonderful partners at the Fauquier and Loudoun Garden Club, the Virginia Department of Transportation, and NOVA Parks we have the unique chance to protect a key part of a small, but important struggle of the momentous Gettysburg campaign.

Help us save Upperville and create a park!

The Civil War Trust

Thursday, 10 August 2017

Dropzone Commander 2nd Edition Update:

Dropzone Commander 2nd Edition Update:

Dropzone Commander 2nd Edition Update:

Closed beta testing has begun with our network of Talons playing and providing feedback. If you have a local Talon and want to get involved please speak to them about how you can take part.

The Hawk Team have been playtesting between ourselves and we're enjoying approaching the game differently and using previously overlooked and new(!) units. We hope you enjoy testing as much as we are!

Hawk Wargames

Wednesday, 9 August 2017

New Great Northern War Flags from Pendraken Miniatures

Even though the moulding queue has slowed somewhat, the new releases continue and this time we've got some revamped GNW flags for everyone.  These are once more the work of the Mr Tony Hughes (Tiny Tin Troops) and replace all of the existing sheets as well as adding a second set for the Russians.

Great Northern War

PNFL220   Swedish flags, type 1

PNFL220   Swedish flags, type 1

PNFL221   Swedish flags, type 2

PNFL221   Swedish flags, type 2

PNFL222   Russian flags, type 1

PNFL222   Russian flags, type 1

PNFL223   Russian flags, type 2

PNFL223   Russian flags, type 2

All priced at £2.50 per sheet

Forum Discussion
Pendraken Miniatures

Jackson is with you

Jackson is with you

On a hot afternoon 155 years ago today, an outnumbered Union force under the command of Nathaniel P. Banks a former politician turned general launched a two-pronged assault against General “Stonewall” Jackson’s veteran soldiers. Wading through fields of corn and wheat, the Yankees endured volley after volley of Confederate fire. Yet, despite suffering heavy losses, the boys in blue kept coming, surging over and momentarily breaking the Confederate line. As the battle hung in the balance, Jackson raced forward. Looking to inspire his wavering men, the Virginian seized a battle flag and waved it above his head. Attempting to draw his sword, he discovered that it had rusted into its scabbard from lack of use. Unperturbed, Jackson raised his blade, scabbard and all, shouting, “Jackson is with you!”

The gallant performance produced the desired effect. Jackson’s men rallied, buying time for General A.P. Hill to launch a powerful counterattack that set the Union troops on their heels. The defeat of Banks gave Lee’s army the opportunity to initiate a new strategic offensive, resulting in Confederate victories at Second Manassas and Chantilly and paving the way for the invasion of Maryland.

Thanks to your heroic support, we have saved 498 acres of hallowed ground at Cedar Mountain, including the spot where “Stonewall” Jackson dramatically turned the tide of the battle. Future generations will be able to learn about the battle that set in motion events that altered the course of history. Working with our partners at the Friends of Cedar Mountain Battlefield, the Trust has continued the task of restoring and interpreting this site. We recently installed fence railing, restored the famous Crittenden gate, set up a new interpretative trail, and put in place a series of metal silhouettes that allow visitors to reimagine the thrilling and terrible events of 155 years ago.

Explore our website to learn more about the Battle of Cedar Mountain and our efforts to restore the Cedar Mountain battlefield.

New Insights Into Cedar Mountain Photography

Learn about recent insights about photography at the Battle of Cedar Mountain from Crystal Marshall and the Trust’s own Garry Adelman.

We Need Your Help!

Help the Civil War Trust preserve Brandy Station and Cedar Mountain by adding your voice to the growing chorus calling for the creation of a new state park!

Ten Facts about Cedar Mountain

Who were the key Union and Confederate commanders at Cedar Mountain? What made the battle significant? How did the fighting begin? Learn the answers to these questions and more with our collection of Ten Facts about the Battle of Cedar Mountain.

Cedar Mountain Photos

View historic and modern photos as well as a historic illustration from the Battle of Cedar Mountain.

The Civil War Trust

Tuesday, 8 August 2017

Medieval Warfare VII-4, Sep-Oct 2017

Medieval Warfare VII-4, Sep-Oct 2017

Medieval Warfare VII.4 with The Battle of Hattin.

Fought on July 4, 1187, Saladin’s victory over King Guy of Lusignan paved the way for the reconquest of Jerusalem.

Theme: The Battle of Hattin

William J. Purkis, 'The sign of the cross on his forehead - Did Crusaders get tattoos?'
William E. Welsh, 'The rise of the Ayyubids - Saladin's apprenticeship in Egypt'.
Andrew Latham, 'The geopolitics of the Medieval Middle East - Was it just Crusade and Jihad?'.
Erich B. Anderson, 'Victory before the fall - The Siege of Kerak'.
Robert C.L. Holmes, 'Ayyubid military organization under Saladin - Family, finance, and faith'.
John France, '"Give the lie to the Devil" - The Battle of Hattin'.
John Hosler, 'The consequences of poor strategy - Saladin's post-Hattin malaise'.
Kay Smith and Ruth Brown, '"Millions of meandering lines" - Of swords, steel, and Saladin'.
Michael S. Fulton, 'The wedge between Egypt and Syria - The Crusader castle of Montreal'.
Rosie Weetch, 'The museum of the Order of St John, London - Bearers of the Cross'.

Features:
Steven Isaac, 'A pirate-monk in the English Channel - The Battle of Sandwich'.
Patrick Eickman, 'Miracles, visions, and St. Barbara's head - Teutonic Knights and PTSD'.
Murray Dahm, 'An invisible clash - The Battle of Hatting on film'.

Medieval Warfare

Saturday, 5 August 2017

Preservation Victory at Three Virginia Battlefields

Preservation Victory at Three Virginia Battlefields

We recently called on our membership to help preserve 391 acres at three of Virginia’s most famous battlefields: Gaines’ Mill, Cedar Mountain, and Cold Harbor. Thanks to the generosity of preservationists like you, we can now celebrate victory on this significant land! This makes a grand total of more than 900 acres of hallowed ground saved by the Civil War Trust at these three storied sites.

At Gaines’ Mill, you helped to preserve acres associated with the charge that broke the Union line on June 27, 1862 another vital link in the growing assemblage of land we have protected there in the last five years. You also helped to triple the number of preserved acres at the Cedar Mountain battlefield in Culpeper County, where the Friends of Cedar Mountain Battlefield this weekend will commemorate the battle’s 155th anniversary. This land a whopping 333 acres saved in partnership with the Land Trust of Virginia was a major Union artillery platform during the battle on August 9, 1862. It also served as the scene of a late rearguard action that allowed a portion of the Union army to escape. Lastly, you have helped to preserve Fletcher’s Redoubt on the Cold Harbor battlefield a key feature from the 1864 Overland Campaign.

Thanks to your dedication, these combined 391 acres at Gaines’ Mill, Cedar Mountain, and Cold Harbor are now protected forever. Thank you for helping to honor the memory of Civil War soldiers by saving the land where they sacrificed everything for us.

The Civil War Trust

Friday, 4 August 2017

The Plastic Soldier Company doing 10mm ??

So a preview and a question.

And after a mad management meeting we managed to steal this pic of the upcoming Leopard 1 in development. The render gives some idea of a few of the options in the kit!

Now for the question... Our mad and benign ruler Will, has come up with a mad idea to do moderns in plastic. but I'm 10mm too! Not just 15mm and 20mm.

He has this mad idea for big forces of tanks, AFVs and infantry, all in plastic, in little 'units in a box' packages for Battle Group Northag along with a huge game in a box with the rules and two armies.

We think he has finally lost the plot. but we'd be interested to know what you guys think of gaming Cold War big battles in 10mm plastic.

I'm now off to take my medication after that meeting.


German Leopard 1A3/A4, Canadian C1 A3


The Plastic Soldier Company

Thursday, 3 August 2017

ACW Gamer: The Ezine - Issue 15, Summer 2017

ACW Gamer: The Ezine - Issue 15, Summer 2017

A 35 page PDF (including cover) for you to download online.

 Featuring:

Peter Dennis’ Wargame: The American Civil War Battle in America Series

Refighting Red River
Review - This Bloody Field: Regimental Scenarios for Shiloh
Creating a Teddy Fur Gaming Mat
McDowell vs. Pond AAR - Long Distance miniature gaming.

Wednesday, 2 August 2017

Post Kickstarter Update 1 from Black Gate Miniatures

It's been a couple of weeks (plus two days) since the Kickstarter ended and this morning the money finally come through. Once again, a big thank you to everyone who backed the project.

I have settled my account with Christian (Concept Artist) and paid for the first master Mammoth sculpt. The final miniatures will most likely be split into pieces to make casting easier.

Master Mammoth
Master Mammoth
 Next up is one of the Shaman sculpts.

Shaman Character
Shaman Character
 The only other thing I need to keep you updated about is the time scale.

When I planned this Kickstarter, it was intended for the production of Mammoth Riders, but I also planned for making the Characters including the ones mounted on Mammoths. I didn't expect to be making the whole of the rest of the range. I am delighted to be able to produce the rest of the range but need to explain the process going forwards.

I have a single, very talented sculptor called Robi. We had discussed the Kickstarter before launch and he had created me a window in his sculpting schedule. This window was for the production of the Mammoth Riders and Characters. With the success of the Kickstarter (which is a good thing) the amount of work for Robi has increased considerably. He is trying to make more space for us, and it's possible that everything could be completed in time for me to meet the October deadline, but I need to inform people that the deadline may slip. I will however, make sure the Mammoths and Characters are ready on time, and if people want them shipped separately then we will sort that out individually.

I expect the next update in a week or two, when I have some more sculpts to share and maybe even a bit of moulding and casting.

I will also be holding off on sending the Backer Survey until probably early September, in order to be in a better position to ask the right questions about delivery etc. You can only send it once and so it has to be done right first time.

That's it for now.

Ogres forever!

Barry

Kickstarter
Black Gate Miniatures

Ancient History Magazine XI.3, Sep-Oct 2017

Ancient History Magazine XI.3, Sep-Oct 2017

Ancient Warfare XI.3 with Caesar vs Pompey in the Balkans

The year is 48 BC. Can the forces of Pompey and the Roman senate withstand the veteran legions of Julius Caesar?

Theme: Caesar vs Pompey in the Balkans.

Joseph Hall, 'Caesar, Pompey and the Roman senate - Road to civil war'.
Séan Hussmann, 'Propaganda in Caesar's Bellum Civile - Restitutor Libertatis'.
Murray Dahm, 'Caesar prepares for the Balkans campaign - Doing what they least expect'.
Paul McDonnell-Staff, 'The Dyrrhachium campaign - A painful defeat for Caesar'.
Lindsay Powell, 'The Battle of Pharsalus, 9 August 48 BC - When eagles clashed'.
Ben Angell, 'The armies of Caesar and Pompey - Setting the stage'.
Kurt Hamilton, 'Pompey and the senate - Shackled to a corpse'.
Joseph Hall, 'Further reading - Pompey and Caesar'.

Features:

Duncan B. Campbell, 'The cavalry of the legion - Glorious horsemen'.
Tacticus, 'The art of tactics - Taktikè technè, part III'.
Erich B. Anderson, 'Armoured cavalry in Northwest Europe - The cataphract of Borbetomagus'.

Ancient History Magazine

Chig: Sky Pilot to the Glider Pilots of Arnhem

Chig: Sky Pilot to the Glider Pilots of Arnhem

New, hitherto unseen, first-hand accounts of the battle of Arnhem, the heroic Allied military operation known as ‘Market Garden’, become rarer as time passes.

“Chig: Sky Pilot to the Glider Pilots of Arnhem” is the story of a choir boy, who became a country parson, who took part in Operation ‘Market Garden’ as Chaplain to the men of the Glider Pilot Regiment. When he left home “Chig” – Rowland Chignell – later the Rev’d Prebendary Chignell, wrote often to his father.

Remarkably his father kept those letters written between August 1940 and September 1944 before, post-war, returning them to Chig. Chig died, in 1994, and when his effects were being cleared, among them was a small bundle of papers, containing 84 dog-eared letters Chig had written to his father.

With them were eight densely-typed foolscap pages. This extraordinary and unique document, Chig’s account of his time in Arnhem with GPR, recounting first-hand conditions which got increasingly hairier before ultimately, under heavy fire, came the withdrawal across the Rhine. The early letters provide almost a social history of wartime rural life in two small parishes in south Shropshire, recounted by a newly-married, newly-appointed country parson.

‘Dig for Victory’, the establishment of a pig club, and keeping of hens, are on the agenda. The difficulty of obtaining petrol and tyres is noted, and yet Chig’s cricket club has petrol for the mowers which maintain pitch and outfield to allow to be played against the various Service units stationed nearby – good for morale.

A Searchlight Battery’s arrival led to Chig becoming their unofficial chaplain. His greater awareness of the vital role played by Service Chaplains led, too, to his volunteering himself as a Chaplain to the to the Forces. Attached initially to the Parachute Regiment’s Training Unit – when the use of para-troops in war was still very novel – Chig later was asked to transfer to the GPR.

The tenor of the letters change, yet always painting a full and varied picture about his own role (in so far as war-time security allowed) but also about bird-life and the scenery, and about music too – a great love shared with his musical father. Padre Chignell’s letters tell a story that demands to be told.

Tuesday, 1 August 2017

Update: Preserve Washington's Charge at Princeton

Update: Preserve Washington's Charge at Princeton

Earlier this year, I told you about an unprecedented campaign to save 15 crucial acres at the heart of the Princeton battlefield. On January 3, 1777, George Washington led a daring counterattack across this land, beating the British and reinvigorating the fight for American Independence. Without a doubt, this is some of the most important unprotected battlefield land in America hallowed ground that must be saved.

Thanks to the generosity of members like you and anticipated government funding, we have already raised $2,500,000 to help preserve this key piece of American history. I cannot begin to thank you enough for your support. However, there is still much more work to be done. The purchase price for this land is $4,000,000, leaving us with more than $1,500,000 left to raise before the end of this year.

This is no easy task, but it is one we must accomplish.

Today, many Americans forget that our independence was not assured with the signing of the Declaration of Independence. King George III was not going to sit back and let his American colonies walk away without a fight. The British sent some of their best troops and ablest commanders to North America to stamp out the rebellion. To ensure the promise of the Declaration of Independence, Americans would have to fight and defeat some of the best soldiers in the world.

That is precisely what happened at Princeton. Americans under the command of General Hugh Mercer locked horns with a column of British Regulars. After a brief firefight, it appeared as if the Redcoats had the upper hand. Mercer was down and the Americans were falling back. In that moment, George Washington appeared. He rallied those retreating men, and with reinforcements, charged the Redcoats, putting them to flight and winning the day. For the first time, American troops had beaten the King’s men in the field, proving that, with determination and courage, independence could be won.

Now, I am asking you to help us tell this story by preserving the land where Washington’s Charge took place. In saving this land, you are ensuring that future generations will be able to walk the ground where Washington and the first American citizen–soldiers sacrificed everything to create the country in which we are blessed to now live.

Please donate today to save Princeton.

Campaign 1776
The Civil War Trust