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Thursday, 22 December 2016

Halfway to our Match Goal at Princeton!

Halfway to our Match Goal at Princeton!

Last week I shared with you an incredible $3-to-$1 matching funds pledge for up to $100,000 to help save 15 key acres at the Princeton battlefield in New Jersey land over which George Washington led the counterattack against the British Redcoats where that battle was won and American morale restored in the first days of 1777. Thanks to many members like you, we have raised more than half the $100,000 goal to be matched with $300,000 pledged by 3 generous donors.

We are 50% of the way there. Will you help us raise the rest?

On the morning of January 3, 1777, General Hugh Mercer, leading the American column marching on Princeton, didn't shy away when his men were attacked by the British regulars under Colonel Charles Mawhood. The success or failure of Washington’s march on Princeton fell on Mercer’s shoulders. Would his men flee in the face of the British or stand and fight? His men stood tall, citizen soldiers standing firm against the onslaught of professional soldiers. Only when the British resorted to the bayonet did the Americans give way. And, by then, the rest of the Continental army and Washington himself was arriving on the field. Mercer’s brief stand bought the Americans the time to meet the threat and prepare for victory.

We are at the halfway point in our effort to raise this $100,000 that desperate interim in which victory and defeat hang in the balance. If we raise the remaining $50,000 toward this match, the total of $100,000 will be tripled, giving us $300,000 toward the $4 million cost to secure and preserve the land over which Washington led his famous charge.

As a battlefield preservationist, I'm sure you share my excitement at the prospect of protecting this hallowed ground with its rich historical importance. Will you help me ensure this battlefield land is protected for future generations to continue to recognize the compelling story that land has to tell?

The Civil War Trust