Facebook

Monday, 3 December 2012

Making American Civil War Blockhouse

Making American Civil War Blockhouse

Below is a tutorial on Making American Civil War Blockhouse (ACW). A very good friend of mine from the Grimsby Wargames Society built an American Civil War (ACW) blockhouse for his 15 mm figures and so inspired me I just had to build one for my own 10mm figures.

ACW Blockhouse

ACW Blockhouse picture 1

ACW Blockhouse picture 2

ACW Blockhouse picture 3

ACW Blockhouse picture 4

ACW Blockhouse picture 5

Making ACW Blockhouse

1. The first step is to cut your bases to the desired size either using MDF or hardboard in my case I used hardboard and cut it to 6 inch wide by 6 inch long once you have cut your bases to the desired size you then want to proceed to rasp the edges to give it a smoother appearance.

2. The next phase is the glue the tiles spaces on to the hardboard using a glue gun at edges of the base.

3. The next step is to texture your base. I have done tutorial on basing.

4. Then using foam board I cut the basic shape for the blockhouse which consisted of two basic squares the first being 2 1/2 inches long and the height was 1 inch the second square was 2 inches long and 1 inch high I then glued and pinned the two squares together.

Making ACW Blockhouse picture 2

5. Once the foam board had dried I then cut up the reed window blind to fit around the top square of the blockhouse which was glued in place with PVA

6. On the lower square I cut strips of cardboard to imitate wood planking and also made a small cardboard door

Making ACW Blockhouse picture 3

7. The reed window blind was cut to appropriate lengths to be glued to the tile spaces to make fencing.

8. The main building and the fences were painted in Humbrol No. 67 Tank Grey and dry brushed with Humbrol No. 160 German Camouflage Red Brown.

Making ACW Blockhouse picture 4

Making ACW Blockhouse picture 5

Making ACW Blockhouse picture 6

Making ACW Blockhouse picture 7

Making ACW Blockhouse picture 8

Making ACW Blockhouse picture 9

Tools

Pencil
Tape measure
Wood saw
Rasp
Paintbrushes
Glue Gun

Materials

Hardboard
Polycell Textured Ceilings Course Effect
Ronseal Diamond Hard Varnish, matt clear
Noch Summer Meadow Grass
PVA
Foam Board
Cardboard
Reed Window Blind
Tile Spaces

Humbrol Colours

Humbrol No. 110 Natural Wood
Humbrol No. 103 Cream
Humbrol No. 67 Tank Grey
Humbrol No. 160 German Camouflage Red Brown

Thursday, 20 September 2012

The Battle of Philippi

The Battle of Philippi

 The Battle of Philippi also known as The Philippi Races 3 June 1861. Union, under Colonels Benjamin Franklin Kelley and Frederick W. Lander, 3,000. Killed, 2, wounded 2, missing 2. Confederate, under Col. George A. Porterfield, numbers not reported. Killed, 16 wounded, unknown missing 26. 

In conformity with our plan we proceed to narrate the progress of battles in the order of their succession, which carries us, in rapid transition, from one portion of the country to another, and brings each action vividly before the eye as it transpires. The most important engagement, after the fighting in the streets of Baltimore, the occupation of Annapolis and Alexandria, and the attacks of the enemy's batteries on Aquia Creek, was that at Philippi, in Western Virginia, on the 3 June 1861. The Union forces, under the command of Brigadier General Thomas A. Morris, were in the possession of Grafton. The rebels were at Philippi, under Colonel George A. Porterfield. Having determined to send out an expedition to surprise them, it was organized in two divisions one, consisting of the First Virginia Regiment, and the Ninth and Sixteenth Ohio, under the command of Colonel Benjamin Franklin Kelley the other, of the Sixth and Seventh Indiana, the Fourteenth Ohio, and a section of artillery, under the combined command of Colonels Ebenezer Dumont and Frederick W. Lander. They set out on their march in a terrific storm, through an unexplored and uneven country, on the night of the 2d of June. At four o'clock in the morning. Frederick W. Lander, who was to attack the enemy in front, took up his position across the river on a hill commanding the town. Benjamin Franklin Kelley was to attack them in rear. The plan matured at headquarters failed in its execution. Benjamin Franklin Kelley was impeded in his march of twenty-two miles by roads rendered almost impassable by the darkness of the night and the violence of the storm. On arriving, he found the town aroused instead of surprised, and Frederick W. Lander already engaged with the enemy. To add to the discomfiture caused by the lateness of his force, it came up in the wrong direction. Recovering from this error, however, it charged upon the enemy's encampments with improved promptness and great gallantry. Frederick W. Lander's batteries had in the mean time done terrible execution. Suddenly, while Benjamin Franklin Kelley was pressing them closely, he came down the hill like a thunderbolt, and joined iii the pursuit of the enemy. In this action Colonel Benjamin Franklin Kelley was severely wounded. Sixteen of the rebels were killed several wounded and taken prisoners, and a large quantity of camp equipage, arms, etc., were captured. 

Orders of Battle

Confederate Commander-in-chief George A. Porterfield

1st Brigade, under the command of 

1 x Confederate Infantry Regiment
1 x Confederate Infantry Regiment

2nd Brigade, under the command of 

1 x Confederate Infantry Regiment
1 x Confederate Infantry Regiment
1 x Artillery 


Union Commander-in-chief Thomas A. Morris

1st Brigade, under the command of Colonel Benjamin Franklin Kelley

1st Virginia Regiment
9th Ohio Infantry Regiment
16th Ohio Infantry Regiment

2nd Brigade, under the command of Colonels Ebenezer Dumont and Frederick W. Lander

6th Indiana Infantry Regiment
7th Indiana Infantry Regiment
14th Ohio Infantry Regiment 
1 x Artillery

Download This Scenario

The Battle of Philippi

How it Played

Sources

Friday, 14 September 2012

6th Army, Orders of battle, Stalingrad

Active 1942 to 1943

Commanders


Friedrich Wilhelm Ernst Paulus
Friedrich Paulus















Army Troops 

648th Army Signal Regiment
2nd Nebelwerfer Regiment
30th Nebelwerfer Regiment
51st Mortar Regiment
53rd Mortar Regiment
91st Air Defence Regiment
243rd Assault Gun Battalion
245th Assault Gun Battalion
45th Army Engineer Battalion
225th Army Engineer Battalion
294th Army Engineer Battalion
336th Army Engineer Battalion
501st Army Engineer Battalion
605th Army Engineer Battalion
652nd Army Engineer Battalion
672nd Army Engineer Battalion
685th Army Engineer Battalion
912nd Army Engineer Battalion
921st Army Engineer Battalion
925th Army Engineer Battalion

IV Army Corps 

Commanders

General der Pioniere Erwin Jaenecke, from 1 November 1942 to 17  January 1943


General der Pioniere Erwin Jaenecke
Erwin Jaenecke















General der Artillerie Max Pfeffer, from 17 January 1943 to 31 January 1943

General der Artillerie Max Pfeffer
Max Pfeffer














29th Infantry Division (mot)  Generalmajor Hans-Georg Leyser
297th Infantry Division General der Artillerie Max Pfeffer, from 16 January Generalmajor Moritz von Drebber
371st Infantry Division Generalleutnant Richard Stempel

VIII Army Corps

Commanders

General der Artillerie Walter Heitz, from 25 Oktober 1939 to 31 January 1943

General der Artillerie Walter Heitz
Walter Heitz














76th Infantry Division Generalleutnant Carl Rodenburg
113th Infantry Division Generalleutnant Hans-Heinrich Sixt von Armin

XI Army Corps

Commanders

General der Infanterie Karl Strecker, from 1 June 1942 to February 1943

General der Infanterie Karl Strecker
Karl Strecker














44th Infantry Division  Generalleutnant Heinrich-Anton Deboi
376th Infantry Division Generalleutnant Alexander Edler von Daniels
384th Infantry Division  Generalleutnant Eccard Freiherr von Gablenz, from 16 January Generalmajor Hans Dörr

XIV Panzer Corps 

Commanders

General der Panzertruppe Hans-Valentin Hube, from 21 December 1942 to 18 January 1943

General der Panzertruppe Hans-Valentin Hube
Hans-Valentin Hube 














Generalleutnant Helmuth Schlömer, from 17 January 1943 to  1943

3rd Infantry Division (mot) Generalmajor Helmuth Schlömer, from 18 January Oberst Jobst Freiherr von Hanstein
60th Infantry Division (mot) Generalmajor Hans-Adolf von Arenstorff
16th Panzer Division Generalleutnant Günther Angern

LI Army Corps

Commanders

General der Artillerie Walther von Seydlitz-Kurzbach, from 8 May 1942 to 31 January 1943

General der Artillerie Walther von Seydlitz-Kurzbach
Walther von Kurzbach














71st Infantry Division Generalleutnant Alexander von Hartmann, from 25 January Generalmajor Fritz Roske
79th Infantry Division Generalleutnant Richard Graf von Schwerin
94th Infantry Division  Generalleutnant Georg Pfeiffer
100th Jäger Division  Generalleutnant Werner Sanne
295th Infantry Division Generalmajor Otto Korfes
305th Infantry Division Generalleutnant Bernhard Steinmetz
389th Infantry Division  Generalmajor Erich Magnus, from 19 January Generalmajor Martin Lattmann
14th Panzer Division Generalmajor Martin Lattmann
24th Panzer Division Generalleutnant Arno von Lenski

Luftwaffe

9th Flak-Division Generalmajor Wolfgang Pickert

Jagdgeschwader 3 - Wolf-Dietrich Wilcke

10th NKVD Division

The 10th NKVD Division was a Soviet rifle division formed on 1 February 1942.

Commander

Colonel Aleksandr Andreyevich Sarayev, from 1 February 1942 to 5 February 1943

41st Infantry Regiment, Major D. M. Vasilchenko
269th, Infantry Regiment, Lt. Colonel I. I. Kapranov
270th, Infantry Regiment, Major A. K. Zhuravlev
271st, Infantry Regiment, Major A. P. Kostenitsyn
272nd, Infantry Regiment, Major G. P. Savchuk
273rd, Infantry Regiment, Major F. N. Morozov
282nd, Infantry Regiment, Major M. S. Glushchenko
Artillery Regiment
Anti-Tank Battalion ?
Anti-Aircraft Battalion ?
Reconnaissance Company ?

10th NKVD Division, Photos
10th NKVD Division, Doc

39th Guards Rifle Division

The 39th Guards Rifle Division was formed in 1942 from  5th Airborne Corps

Commander

General Stepan Savelevich Guryev

General Stepan Savelevich Guryev
Stepan Savelevich Guryev














112th, Infantry Regiment
117th, Infantry Regiment
120th, Infantry Regiment
87th, Artillery Regiment
Anti-Tank Battalion ?
Anti-Aircraft Battalion ?
Reconnaissance Company ?

37th Guards Rifle Division

The division was formed on 2 August 1942 from the 1st Airborne Corps in Lyubertsy, near Moscow.

Commander

General Viktor Grigorivich Zholudev

General Viktor Grigorivich Zholudev
Viktor Grigorivich Zholudev














109th, Infantry Regiment
114th, Infantry Regiment
118th, Infantry Regiment
86th, Artillery Regiment
Anti-Tank Battalion ?
Anti-Aircraft Battalion ?
Reconnaissance Company ?

37th Guards Rifle Division, Photos
37th Guards Rifle Division, Doc

35th Guards Rifle Division

The 35th Guards Rifle Division was formed from an airborne corps in the summer of 1942.

Commander

General Vasili A. Glazkov, from to  Killed on 8th Sept 1942

General Vasili A. Glazkov
Vasili A. Glazkov













Colonel V.P. Dubyanski, from 8th Sept 1942

100th, Infantry Regiment
101st, Infantry Regiment
102nd, Infantry Regiment
112th,  Artillery Regiment
Anti-Tank Battalion ?
Anti-Aircraft Battalion ?

Reconnaissance Company ?

35th Guards Rifle Division, Photos 35th Guards Rifle Division, Doc

13th Guards Rifle Division

The 13th Guards Rifle Division itself was formed on 19 January 1942, when the 87th Rifle Division was awarded Guards status and re-designated as the 13th Guards Rifle Division.

Commander

General Aleksander Ilyich Rodimtsev.

General Aleksander Ilyich Rodimtsev
Aleksander Ilyich Rodimtsev














34th, Infantry Regiment
39th, Infantry Regiment
42nd, Infantry Regiment
32nd, Artillery Regiment
Anti-Tank Battalion ?
Anti-Aircraft Battalion ?
Reconnaissance Company ?

13th Guards Rifle Division, Photos
13th Guards Rifle Division, Doc

62nd Army, Orders of battle Stalingrad

Active 10 Jul 1942 to 16 Apr 1943

STAVKA Representatives

Army General G.K. Zhukov

Army General G.K. Zhukov
G.K. Zhukov














Colonel-General of Artillery N.N. Voronov

Colonel-General of Artillery N.N. Voronov
N.N. Voronov














Colonel-General A.M. Vasilevsky

Colonel-General A.M. Vasilevsky
A.M. Vasilevsky














Stalingrad Front

Colonel General Andrey Yeryomenko

Colonel General Andrey Yeryomenko
Andrey Yeryomenko














Political Officer Nikita Khrushchev

Political Officer Nikita Khrushchev
Nikita Khrushchev














The Stalingrad Front, under the command of Colonel General Andrey Yeryomenko, assisted by Political Officer Nikita Khrushchev, included the following units.

Commanders

Lieutenant General Vasily Chuikov

Lieutenant General Vasily Chuikov
Vasily Chuikov















Guards Rifle Divisions

13th Guards Rifle Division, General Aleksander Ilyich Rodimtsev.
35th Guards Rifle Division,  General Vasili A. Glazkov  (Killed on  8th Sept 1942) (later Colonel V.P.
37th Guards Rifle Division, General Viktor Grigorivich Zholudev
39th Guards Rifle Division, General Vasili A. Glazkov


Rifle Divisions

45th Rifle Division, Lieutenant-Colonel Vasili Pavlovich Sokolov
95th Rifle Division, Vasili Akimovich Gorishny
112th Rifle Division, Lieutenant-Colonel Vasili Pavlovich Sokolov
138th Rifle Division, Ivan Ivanovich Gorishny Lyudnikov
193rd Rifle Division, General Fedor Nikandrovich Smekhotvorov
196th Rifle Division, Brigade Commissar Averin (later Colonel S.P. Ivanov)
244th Rifle Division, Colonel G.A. Afanasiev
284th Rifle Division, Colonel Nikolai F. Batuyk
308th Rifle Division, Colonel Leonti Nikolayevich Gurtiev
10th NKVD Division, Colonel A.A. Sarayev

Naval Infantry Brigades

92nd Naval Infantry Brigade, Colonel Tarasov (Abandoned Brigade
during heavy fighting in Stalingrad. Court-martialled and probably executed)
(later Major I.I. Samodai)

Special Brigades

42nd, Colonel M.S. Batrakov (wounded Sept. 23th 1942)
115th, Colonel K.M. Andryusenko
124th, Colonel Seymon F. Gorokov
149th, Lieutenant-Colonel V.A. Bolvinov (killed Nov. 2nd 1942) (later Major I.D. Durnev
160th

Motorised Rifle Brigades

38th Motorised Rifle Brigade, Colonel Ivan D. Burmakov

Tank Brigades

84th Tank Brigade, Colonel D.N. Bely
137th Tank Brigade
189th Tank Brigade, Lieutenant-Colonel K.S. Udovichenko

Airforce

8th Air Army General Timofey Khryukin

24th Panzer Division






The 24th Panzer Division (24. Panzer-Division) formed in France in February 1942 largely from the former 1st Cavalry Division, which had fought as a brigade in Poland and as a division in France and in the early stages of the Russian campaign. Transferred to the Southern Russian front in the summer of 1942 and virtually destroyed at Stalingrad.

Commander

Generalleutnant Bruno Ritter von Hauenschild, from 15 April 1942 to 12 September 1942

Generalleutnant Bruno Ritter von Hauenschild
Bruno Ritter
von Hauenschild















Generalleutnant Arno von Lenski, from 12 September 1942 to 1 March 1943

Generalleutnant Arno von Lenski
Arno von Lenski














24 Panzer Regiment
24 Panzergrenadier Brigade
21 Panzergrenadier Regiment
26 Panzergrenadier Regiment
40 Panzer Reconnaissance Battalion
89 Artillery Regiment
40 Panzer Pionier Battalion
40 Anti-Tank Battalion
40 Signal Battalion

Auxiliary unit number 40
Home Station I

24th Panzer Division, Photos
24th Panzer Division, Doc

16th Panzer Division






The 16th Panzer Division (16. Panzer-Division) originally the 16th Infantry Division, belonging to the peacetime army, with personnel from Westphalia and some East Prussians. As such was on the Saar front for a period and later took part in the attack on Sedan in support of armored formations. Reorganized as the 16th Panzer Division in the late summer of 1940. First identified in action during the early weeks of the Russian campaign and then continuously engaged in the southern sector. Virtually destroyed at Stalingrad.

Commander

Generaloberst Hans-Valentin Hube, from 1 November 1940 to 15 September 1942

Generaloberst Hans-Valentin Hube
Hans-Valentin Hube














Generalleutnant Günther Angern, from 15 September 1942 to 1943

2 Panzer Regiment
16 Panzergrenadier Brigade
79 Panzergrenadier Regiment
16 Panzer Reconnaissance Battalion
16 Artillery Regiment
16 Panzer Pionier Battalion
16 Anti-Tank Battalion
16 Signal Battalion

Auxiliary unit number 16
Home Station Munster (Wkr. VI)


23 August 1942

September

October

November

December

January

2 February 1943

16th Panzer Division, Photos
16th Panzer Division, Doc

14th Panzer Division

The 14th Panzer Division (14. Panzer-Division) originally the 4th Infantry Division, belonging to the peacetime army, with personnel from Saxony and Sudetenland. As such fought well in Poland and in the French campaign and was reorganized as the 14th Panzer Division in the late summer of 1940. Fought in Yugoslavia in the Balkan campaign and was continuously engaged on the Southern Russian front, where it was finally encircled and virtually destroyed at Stalingrad.

Commander 

Generalleutnant Ferdinand Heim, from 1 July 1942 to 1 November 1942

Generalleutnant Ferdinand Heim
Ferdinand Heim














Generalleutnant Hans Freiherr von Falkenstein, from 1 November 1942 to 16 November 1942

Generalleutnant Johannes Baeßler, from 16 November 1942 to 26 November 1942

Generalmajor Martin Lattmann, from 26 November 1942 to 1943

Generalmajor Martin Lattmann
Martin Lattmann














36 Panzer Regiment
103 Panzergrenadier Regiment
108 Panzergrenadier Regiment
14 Panzer Reconnaissance Battalion
4 Artillery Regiment
13 Panzer Pionier Battalion
4 Anti-Tank Battalion
4 Signal Battalion

Auxiliary unit number 4
Home Station Dresden (Wkr. IV)

14th Panzer Division, Photos
14th Panzer Division, Doc

3rd Infantry Division (mot)

The 3rd Infantry Division (mot)





The 3rd Infantry Division (mot) (3. Infanterie-Division (mot.)) was an active division mainly recruited in Prussia. As such it took part in the Polish campaign and the Battle of France, without winning any special distinction. Motorized in autumn, 1940. Fought in Russia from the beginning, at first in the center and subsequently in the southern sector, where it was virtually destroyed at Stalingrad.

Commander

Helmuth Schlömer 1 April 1942 to 15 January 1943

103 Panzer Battalion
8 Infantry Regiment (mot)
29 Infantry Regiment (mot)
53 Motorcycle Reconnaissance Battalion (mot)
3 Artillery Regiment (mot)
3 Pionier Battalion (mot)
3 Anti-Tank Battalion (mot)
3 Signal Battalion (mot)

Auxiliary unit number 3
Home Station Frankfurt/Oder (Wkr.III)

3rd Infantry Division (mot), Photos
3rd Infantry Division (mot), Doc

29th Infantry Division (mot)






The 29th Infantry Division (mot) (29. Infanterie-Division (mot.)) was formed on 1 October 1936 from personnel largely Thuringian. Moved great distances and fought hard in Poland and France. Identified in the central sector in Russia in July 1941. Transferred to the southern sector in the summer of 1942 and virtually destroyed at! Stalingrad.

Commander 

Generalmajor Max Fremerey, from   20 September 1941 to 25 September 1942

Generalmajor Max Fremerey
Max Fremerey














Generalmajor Hans-Georg Leyser, from  25 September 1942 to  January 1943

Generalmajor Hans-Georg Leyser
Hans-Georg Leyser














129th Panzer Battalion
12 Panzer II
35 Panzer III (5 cm lg)
  8 Panzer IV (lg)
  2 Panzer Befehlswagen

15th Infantry Regiment (mot)
71st Infantry Regiment (mot)
29th Motorcycle Reconnaissance Battalion
29th Artillery Regiment
29th Pioneer Battalion
29th Anti-Tank Battalion (mot)
29th Signals Battalion

Auxiliary unit number 29
Home Station Erfurt (Wkr. IX)

29th Infantry Division (mot), Photos
29th Infantry Division (mot), Doc

44th Infantry Division







The 44th Infantry Division (44. Infanterie-Division) formed on 1 April 1938 from personnel mainly Austrian. Sustained heavy casualties in Poland. Saw little fighting but marched great distances in France. Morale less high than that of the other Austrian active divisions. Engaged in Russia on' the southern front from the beginning of the campaign. Virtually destroyed at Stalingrad.

Commander

Generalleutnant Heinrich Deboi, from  2 Mai 1942 to 29 January 1943

Generalleutnant Heinrich Deboi
Heinrich Deboi














131 Infantry Regiment
132 Infantry Regiment
134 Infantry Regiment
44 Reconnaissance Battalion
96 Artillery Regiment
80 Pionier Battalion
46 Anti-Tank Battalion
64 Signal Battalion

Auxiliary unit number 44
Home Station Wien (Wkr. XVII)

44th Infantry Division, Photos
44th Infantry Division, Doc

60th Infantry Division (mot)








The 60th Infantry Division (mot) (60. Infanterie-Division (mot.)) was originally the 60th Infantry Division formed at Danzig in August 1939 and embodying the Danzig Heimwehr. As such took part in the attack on the Hela peninsula in September 1939 and in the French campaign. In the late summer of 1940 it provided a nucleus for the formation of the 60th Motorized Division, which fought in Yugoslavia in April 1941. Subsequently in the southern sector in Russia. Virtually destroyed at Stalingrad.

Commander 

Generalleutnant Otto Kohlermann, from 15 May 1942 to November 1942

Generalmajor Hans-Adolf von Arenstorff, from November 1942 to 1943

Generalmajor Hans-Adolf von Arenstorff
Hans-Adolf von Arenstorff,














160 Panzer Battalion
92 Infantry Regiment (mot)
120 Infantry Regiment (mot)
160 Motorcycle Reconnaissance Battalion (mot)
160 Artillery Regiment (mot)
160 Pionier Battalion (mot)
160 Anti-Tank Battalion (mot)
160 Signal Battalion (mot)

Auxiliary unit number 160
Home Station Danzig (Wkr. XX)

60th Infantry Division (mot), Photos
60th Infantry Division (mot), Doc

71st Infantry Division






The 71st Infantry Division (71. Infanterie-Division) Reserve division formed on mobilization and recruited mainly from the Hannover area. On the Saar front for a period.. Fought with distinction in the Sedan area and in the advance on Verdun. Fought in Russia in the southern sector for the first four months of the campaign, then returned to France and left again for the Eastern front during April 1942. Virtually destroyed at Stalingrad.

Commander

General der Infanterie Alexander von Hartmann, from 28 March 1941 to 1943

General der Infanterie Alexander von Hartmann
Alexander von Hartmann














191 Infantry Regiment
194 Infantry Regiment
211 Infantry Regiment
171 Reconnaissance Battalion
171 Artillery Regiment
171 Pionier Battalion
171 Anti-Tank Battalion
171 Signal Battalion

Auxiliary unit number 171
Home Station Hildesheim (Wkr. XI)

71st Infantry Division, Photos
71st Infantry Division, Doc